It’s Finally Here! The Book is Officially Released

BooksToday’s the day! May 5th– the official release date for Legendary Locals of Boston’s South End.

To celebrate the book’s release, there will be several book events in the South End in May. Check the events page for details!

Be sure to visit the News section of the website for updates about programs, announcements about the book, and more!

And finally, to purchase the book, visit here or buy one in person at one of the book events.

Happy reading!

 

Advertisements

Local Spotlight: Jovita Fontanez

Image belongs to the author's collection

Jovita Fontanez working at an election. Image belongs to the author’s collection.

On Thursdays, the South End Historical Society features people from Legendary Locals of Boston’s South End in its South End Fact social media posts. Today’s South End Fact post read:

“Dartmouth Street resident Jovita Fontanez was the first Latina elected to the Electoral College of Massachusetts.”

Here is a selection from Jovita Fontanez’s profile in the book: “Born in New York to Puerto Rican parents, Jovita Fontanez moved to the South End with her family when she was a young child. She later purchased a house on Dartmouth Street, where she raised her two children and still lives today. Drawn to aiding underserved and impoverished people, Fontanez helped found the South End Community Health Center and served as its associate director. She also worked with the director of Casa Esperanza in Roxbury to set up their Latinas y Niños Center, a treatment program that helps pregnant women and mothers recover from alcohol and drug addiction.”

To learn more about Jovita Fontanez, check out her profile on page 34 of the book (it comes out on May 5th). Pre-order your copy here.

To receive the South End Trivia and South End Fact posts, follow our friends at the South End Historical Society on Twitter and Facebook.

Local Spotlight: Frieda Garcia

Frieda Garcia at Frieda Garcia Park, 2013. Image courtesy of Maryellen Hassell

Frieda Garcia at Frieda Garcia Park, 2013. Image courtesy of Maryellen Hassell

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the South End Historical Society is featuring people from Legendary Locals of Boston’s South End in its South End Trivia and South End Fact social media posts. Today’s South End Trivia post read:

“In 2013, the city opened a new park on Stanhope St. What South Ender is this park named for?”

Did you know the answer? Frieda Garcia.

Here is a selection from Frieda Garcia’s profile in the book: “Born in the Dominican Republic, Frieda Garcia moved to New York City with her family at the age of eight. She relocated to Boston in 1965 and began working at the Roxbury Multi-Service Center. While there, Garcia noticed that Spanish-speaking communities were underserved by Boston social-service organizations. She responded in 1969 by joining the fledgling La Alianza Hispana (the Spanish Alliance), an organization that helps bring neighborhood and social services to Spanish-speaking people in the Boston area. Garcia went on to work for Governors Sargent and Dukakis and served on Dukakis’s judiciary nominating commission for four years.”

To learn more about Frieda Garcia and how she became involved in the South End, check out her profile on page 11 of the book (it comes out on May 5th). Pre-order your copy here.

To receive the South End Trivia and South End Fact posts, follow our friends at the South End Historical Society on Twitter and Facebook.

Local Spotlight: Activist, Author, and Teacher Melvin H. King

Mel King, image courtesy of the South End Historical Society

Mel King, image courtesy of the South End Historical Society

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the South End Historical Society is featuring people and information from Legendary Locals of Boston’s South End in its South End Trivia and South End Fact social media posts. Today’s South End Fact post read:

“In 1968, South End activist, author, and teacher Mel King led the famous demonstrations at Tent City.”

Here is a selection from Mel King’s profile in the book: “Mel King grew up in the South End’s New York Streets neighborhood. After attending Claflin College in South Carolina, King returned to Boston and received his master’s degree in education from Boston Teacher’s College in 1952. Interested in community development and activism, he served as the director of Boy’s Work at the South End’s Lincoln House and as the director of the New Urban League and also did work for United South End Settlements. He founded C.A.U.S.E. (Community Assembly for a United South End) to fight for the interests of poor residents during urban renewal, led the famous demonstrations at Tent City in 1968, and fought plans to place a highway through portions of several Boston neighborhoods.”

To learn more about Mel King, check out his profile on page 17 of the book (it comes out on May 5th). Pre-order your copy here.

To receive the South End Trivia and South End Fact posts, follow our friends at the South End Historical Society on Twitter and Facebook.

Local Spotlight: Lieutenant Alan Borgal and the Animal Rescue League

Image courtesy of the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Image courtesy of the Animal Rescue League of Boston

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the South End Historical Society is featuring people and information from Legendary Locals of Boston’s South End in its South End Trivia and South End Fact social media posts. Today’s South End Trivia post read:

“Name the Lieutenant who works at the non-profit that stands at the corner of Tremont and Arlington.”

Did you know the Lieutenant? Lt. Alan Borgal!
Do you know the non-profit? The Animal Rescue League of Boston!

Here is a selection from Lt. Borgal’s profile in the book: “Lieutenant Alan Borgal began working at the Animal Rescue League (ARL) almost 40 years ago as a shelter kennel worker. He became a Massachusetts Special State Police officer in 1981 and began investigating incidents of animal cruelty and abuse. Today, Lieutenant Borgal is the director of the Center for Animal Protection at the ARL.”

To learn more about Lieutenant Borgal, his advocacy on behalf of animals, and the awards he’s won, check out his profile on page 10 of the book (it comes out on May 5th). Pre-order your copy here.

To learn more about the great work that the Animal Rescue League of Boston does, visit the ARL’s website here. Special thanks go to them for providing an image of Lt. Borgal for use in the book.

To receive the South End Trivia and South End Fact posts, follow our friends at the South End Historical Society on Twitter and Facebook.

Local Spotlight: Patrick Gilmore

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the South End Historical Society is featuring people and information from Legendary Locals of Boston’s South End in its South End Trivia and South End Fact social media posts. Today’s South End Fact post read: “Patrick Gilmore, author of popular Civil War song ʺJohnny Comes Marching Home,” lived at 2 Sharon Street.”

Here is a selection from Patrick Gilmore’s profile in the book: “An experienced bandleader, Gilmore organized the 1869 and 1872 Peace Jubilees. At the time of both jubilees, Gilmore lived at 2 Sharon Street. He is credited with penning the lyrics to the Civil War song “When Johnny Comes Marching Home.” Check out this video of the United States Military Academy Band playing the song.

To learn more about Patrick Gilmore, check out his profile on page 75 of the book (it comes out on May 5th). Pre-order your copy here.

To receive the South End Trivia and South End Fact posts, follow our friends at the South End Historical Society on Twitter and Facebook.

Local Spotlight: Mary Antin

On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the South End Historical Society is featuring people and information from Legendary Locals of Boston’s South End in its South End Trivia and South End Fact social media posts. Today’s South End Trivia post read: “Name the immigrant who lived on Dover Street, went to Girls’ High School, and wrote The Promised Land.”

Do you know the answer?

Mary Antin!

Here is a selection from Mary Antin’s profile in the book: “Born in Polotsk (in what is now Belarus) in 1881, Mary Antin moved to Boston with her family in 1894. She spent some of her teenage years on Dover Street (now East Berkeley Street) in the immigrant-dominated South End. In 1899, Antin published a book of letters she had written during her trip from Polotsk to Boston in 1894. In 1912, she published her autobiography, The Promised Land.”

To learn more about Mary Antin, check out her profile on page 62 of the book (it comes out on May 5th). Pre-order your copy here.

To receive the South End Trivia and South End Fact posts, follow our friends at the South End Historical Society on Twitter and Facebook.